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Adobe Launches Technical Communication Suite 4

[Techtaffy Newsdesk]

Adobe  has launched the Adobe Technical Communication Suite 4 software, the next generation of its single-source authoring and multi-device publishing toolkit for technical writers, help authors and instructional designers. The new version helps streamline the creation of standards-compliant technical content by leveraging native XML/Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA) support. It also enables authors to make technical information widely accessible on iPad and other tablets and smartphones by publishing to formats such as multiscreen HTML5, eBook and native mobile apps.

Adobe Technical Communication Suite 4, Adobe FrameMaker 11 and Adobe RoboHelp 10 are immediately available in English, French, German and Japanese versions. Estimated street price for Technical Communication Suite 4 is $1899 (upgrades from US$799). Adobe FrameMaker 11 and Adobe RoboHelp 10 are also available as standalone products for an estimated street price of $999 each (upgrades from US$399).

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